RSS

Own Up to It

26 Jan

I came home one night, when I was in high school, and went straight to my room. My mom for some reason came to check on me.
“Have you been drinking?” she asked
“No” I mumbled
“Look at me” She commanded
“I just don’t feel good. I need to sleep”
“Look at me” She commanded again
I rolled over, and sat up. My eyes rolled back in my head and I got sick.
The next day my parents were nice and let me skip church and a family dinner, to sleep it off.
The next Monday at school, my peers gave me a hard time about how hung over I must have been. I denied it. I never admitted to my parents that I was drinking. Everybody knew I drank way too much and lived to survive one of the worst hangovers I’ve ever had.

I never owned up to it. Just took the consequences and moved on

Many cow/calf operators exhibit the same behavior. They suffer the consequences of their actions, move on and repeat them year after year. They never own up to the fact the problems they face year after year are a direct result of their management decisions.

I’m talking about winter calving specifically

Last year there was the story circulating around social media, about the producer who saved his calf from certain death by jumping into the hot tub with him, to save it from hypothermia. Many haled this as proof cattle producers will go to any lengths for the wellbeing of their stock.
If a producer really cares for his stock he will never put them into a potential situation that may cause them harm.

To clear up that statement, let me tell you this story. Last year after the hot tub story circulated, I was in a local salebarn. A couple was there and the husband half was bragging how hard they worked to save a calf from hypothermia. The wife didn’t share his enthusiasm. They had the calf in the bath tub, then in the kitchen for a while. I imagine her lack of enthusiasm was because she had livestock in her house, and it created a livestock kind of mess, and her heroic hubby didn’t help clean up. I went into the office where I know an ABS rep has some calendars stashed. I handed her one of those calendars. I showed her how each day on the calendar shows that if your cow is bred on that day it tells you approximately the day you may expect her to calve. I whispered to her “You can turn your bulls out later, and skip all this mess”. She looked at me like it had never dawned on her before.

During the conventional calving season, the cow/calf guys get up in the middle of the afternoon and leave the salebarn, to go home and check cows. You never know when you will have to intervene, in what should be a natural process, to save a calf. This costs the salebarn money, because they have to turn the heat on when all the hot air these guys expel leaves. What hot air? I can refute any talking point they may have to defend calving in winter. I used to calve in winter and made the change. I used to believe all the same things many of those who will defend it do.

I used to chew Copenhagen. I had a bad habit. One day I had to stop baling hay to run to town because I was out, and couldn’t stand it any longer. A few months later I decided it was stupid to let it have a hold on me like that and just quit. It was extremely hard. Many of you have let your cows do the same thing to you. Or it may be peer pressure from some fool. Either way if you refuse to examine a change you are trapped

I used to follow Ann Barnhardt’s blog back when it was mostly about cattle markets. She had a link to Pharo Cattle Co. I clicked every link on her page, so this was the first time I was exposed to Kit and his ideas. This was the first time I was exposed to the idea of calving in synch with nature. I had all the same ideas many of you winter calvers do and I thought someone really ought to clue this fool in. Funny thing is, ten years later after I changed to calving 1/3 of the year later, at grass time, Kit got smarter. To be clear Kit didn’t change, I did.

Now I’ve stated I can refute any talking point there is. There is one that never comes up. I stated earlier in this post that you are trapped. These talking points you so weakly defend are only in your head. You are a prisoner of your own mind. The hardest thing I had to overcome when changing my calving dates was to let go of the old ideas. Learning the new way was easy.

I can post another blog later if there is a demand for it to refute the common points to defending winter calving. I will give you this to ponder in the mean time. I posted last week that it was 20 below here. Several of my neighbors are calving. I drove by a couple of them. There were dead calves at each place. Imagine if you were wearing summer clothing and were soaking wet after coming out of a room that was 102 degrees. That is exactly what the baby calf experienced. It took only a matter of minutes for that little guy to freeze to the ground. It took a little longer for death to overtake him due to the cold. Like I said if you really cared you would not put your stock in that kind of position.

I know my neighbors worked their asses off during the night. They got cattle into their barns, and got the calves dry and started. They had to kick them out into a pen to make room for another cow in the barn. They bedded the new pairs well. Problem iscattle will bunch up and the calf they worked so hard to save may stepped on by a cow. If it steps on them in the wrong place the calf will be killed.

I know the heart break this causes. You and your stock do not need to go through this. I do know someone who is thrilled. I have not seen a coyote for over a week. I assume they must be eating well, and are sticking close to their new food source, those dead calves.

To wrap it up, I buy cattle year round of varying weights. I know there will always be a supply of cattle for me to bid on. What you may not realize, since you left the auction early to go home and cuddle your cows, is the discounts I get. When you get your check in the mail from the salebarn, you will notice that several of your good calves sold for considerably less. When your nice group of calves walked into the sale ring a guy like me will motion to the auctioneer to hold 3 for example. They sell the group then ask which three I want sorted off. I will point out the two with the froze off ears and the one with the froze off tail. I will then counter, that I will take the whole group and skip sorting if they just adjust the price on them. The discount on those three sure helps cheapen up the group. I know that you’re stunned and upset when you see the price on those three got adjusted. I know you think it’s just a dumb set of buyers who do not know quality. Maybe you’re right. I do not feel sorry for you that you worked so hard to keep them alive, only to turn around a year later and give me a discount. I am thankful.

Advertisements
 
6 Comments

Posted by on January 26, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

6 responses to “Own Up to It

  1. Paul W

    January 26, 2016 at 8:54 am

    Ya know, if you would be having calves now, you would not have time to sit in front of the computer and write these crazy stories! 😉

    I’ve been preaching this to a co-worker… he is calving now and I’m weaning…. and I’m the crazy one!

    Glad to see you writing again.

     
  2. K & M

    January 26, 2016 at 11:56 am

    I am so happy you are back writing. You ideas just make sense. TY for sharing them

     
  3. Greg Hoeing

    January 26, 2016 at 6:04 pm

    thank you for the story (TRUTH ) but also include what KIT has also been preaching to us commercial producers STOP TAGGING CALVES. I tried it this past May and wow what a difference the whole herd was so much calmer knowing i wasn”t a threat. And the added time was an extra bonus . I plan on tagging only heifers that pass the chute test at vac. time that i plan to save.

     
    • fritzgroszkruger

      January 26, 2016 at 9:55 pm

      Did the same thing. Actually tagged 10 before we quit harassing them. One ended up missing. It had run off after the shots and tag. Went through an old fence outside the hot wire. There was tall canary grass out there and I looked and looked for number 32. A couple weeks later Wally (our Huntaway dog) and I were out there in the Ranger and smelled something dead. Wally found it, of course.

      We haven’t weighed them but the calves we couldn’t catch seemed to be bigger over the years than the ones with tags.

      How I wish I’d learned these things 30 years ago. And the only thing winter calving is good for is the stories. Seeing a healthy calf hit the ground, jump up, nurse and follow its mom around isn’t nearly so interesting as calves in the bathtub and kitchen.

       
  4. JW

    January 27, 2016 at 6:35 am

    I would appreciate your article more if you shared some reasons why winter calvers say its better but you dispute that with data.

     
  5. jbd222

    May 24, 2017 at 5:43 am

    this is right on target with what we are doing here up in the Northeast…i will never have to carry a calf through snow drifts or drench in the backseat of my car with the heat blasting in 0 degree weather. Once producers understand the benefits of calving with nature it will become the norm.

     

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: