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Agproud Q. 6 Charity

Question 6. What cause do you care about and how have you supported your favorite charity?

My wife and I strongly feel it is important to help kids. Roughly one in seven kids in our area does not have enough food to eat. Over the years we have helped with several fund drives to help children in our area.

Currently we support our local Back Pack Program. The way this works is children in need are given a back pack full of food and vouchers to take home over the weekend, when they otherwise may not get anything to eat.

I do the easy part, I just donate money. The money is used to purchase the food, and volunteers then fill the back packs. I know the money I give is important, but I do want to say that I feel it is the volunteers who organize this program every year, and the people that take time out from their schedule to help fill the back packs are who really makes this program come to form.

One evening when my wife and I were grocery shopping a little girl who knows my wife came up to her to say hello. This girl was so excited that night because she was going to have pancakes for supper. She received a back pack with pancake mix, fresh fruits, and vouchers for some milk and eggs. She told us that there was enough that she was also going to have pancakes for breakfast the next morning! She even informed us how the back pack program works “these nice people, I never met give money so I can have food to eat”. That comment got both my wife and I choked up. Even though that happened a couple years ago I got a bit teary eyed just typing it.

I want to mention the Back Pack Program got started here by a leadership class through our local Chamber of Commerce. They started this several years ago and it has had a residual lasting effect.

One of my wife’s high school classmates had a little girl with a brain tumor. Another woman in our community wanted to put together a fundraiser to help with medical expenses. She wanted to do an auction and a free will donation lunch. She was asking for help on Facebook. I told my wife to message her and tell her that we would donate enough ground beef to serve at least 600 people, and also a beef bundle as an auction item.

Going back even further we started a fun program at our church. We donated the beef from a calf to our church, and some of it was sold off in a silent auction. The money and the remaining beef were used to serve needy people in our area. The parish really had fun with this. One thing they did was hold a name the steer raffle, to earn some extra money.

We would not be able to do any of these things if we had not been so blessed to be in the cattle biz, and I had not learned the right things from the right people.

 
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Posted by on April 22, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

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Shoo Fly

Every year there are numerous articles about fly control. All of them revolve around using some kind of gimmick for control. Now it’s no mystery why these freebee publications will only write about gimmicks that siphon money out of the pockets of cattle producers. It helps them sell advertising space. They probably also don’t realize there is another way: well managed grazing

stormcattle

I know there are people that read this and want me to provide research to back my claims. I don’t care for scientific research, no matter who conducted it. Here is why, science only tells us how we should act if we want to attain definite ends. So for that research to worth a hoot my cattle, the flies, the weather, and other factors in nature must all act a certain way. Ha! Good luck with that.

Here is what happened for me with better managed grazing. I started putting my cattle into groups of 200 head or more. I use poly wire to split the pasture into smaller grazing cells, and rotate daily to every third day. Cell size will vary based on terrain and water. I rent several different pastures, that are only a few miles apart. I will rotate around one then load the cattle up and haul them to the next pasture, then rotate around that one. (I haul them because I have to cross two major highways, and am surrounded by irrigated corn with no fences around it and I have no help)

One day when I was hauling cattle from one pasture to the next, I had an extension researcher riding along with me. He did the typical routine of rolling up the window every time I loaded and unloaded. He finally noticed that I was not doing the same, and he remarked that there were not any flies getting into the truck. We then looked at the cattle and there were little to no flies on them!

At first we were only interested in how my new grazing system would affect my grass, now we were both interested in following up on how it would affect my cattle and flies. For the next month I had the same results, until I rotated up against the perimeter fence and the neighbor’s cattle bunched up next to mine. Then I had flies, a lot of them. I also ended up with their bull too, I was running stocker heifers.

After loading the cattle up and then moving to the next pasture I still had the flies for a while. This pasture has no neighboring cattle. I rotated as I needed to and eventually the fly load lessened. I think this is because my grazing system breaks the fly cycle. In the short amount of time it takes for a fly to lay an egg and for that egg to become a fly my cattle are gone away from that area.

I have only done this for two years, and have noticed a big difference in fly control. I mentioned the neighbor’s bull for a reason. Long story short they ended up paying for a preg check on my cattle. That got expensive for them in a hurry. The following year, they didn’t turn their cattle out into that pasture until I rotated away from the perimeter fence. That year I didn’t end up with their flies or their bull. To me that one variable right there is why science doesn’t mean much out here. It proves how other people’s sloppiness can affect your plan.

We all know that parasites can affect cattle performance and their behavior, so I don’t feel I need to get into that, to keep this short as possible. I do feel that I should do some cost comparisons.

For my grazing system I had to invest in a fence charger, rolls of poly wire, pigtail posts, a water tank, valve, and portable water line. I bought extra poly wires and posts so I could build fence several cells ahead when I have time, so all I have to do is move the cattle which only takes a little while. My total cost for all this was around $5000. That is a lot of money. Thing is I started this program to help improve the pastures, and it has. This is a small investment when compared to that. Also at the end of the year I still have all that equipment.

hose

If I were to spray my cattle for flies it would cost me $400 for a concentrated solution, that they recommend I mix with water and diesel fuel. The fuel would cost an additional $36. Its by far the cheapest solution. There is labor involved to gather all your cattle in, unless you use a rubber. Here’s the rub for me. Why do you want soak your cattle in a little bit of poison over and over? Second, these products will also kill the good bugs that are essential for a healthy pasture. Not to mention the pests you are trying to get rid of will come back before the beneficial bugs do. How do you assign a cost to that? I am not sure but I can assure you it would be high.

Fly tags would cost me almost $2000. I have used fly tags in the past and they are just crap. In fact when I buy my grass calves, if they already have fly tags in their ears (which is the wrong time to even have them in, leading to the flies building a resistance to them) I cut them out, even though they are brand new.

Then there is using flow through control in your mineral. I’ve tried this and it didn’t make a whole lot of difference. Also I have never gotten a straight answer on how it affects dung beetles. That literally could be a million dollar question that I have not yet got an answer to. If I were to add Altosid IGR to my mineral it would cost me an additional $1600. If I used it in tubs for 60 days it would cost me and additional $1900. (cost difference in tubs with compared to without, so you would also need to add in the cost of the tub/mineral itself) Then begs the question of what do you do with the empty tubs. Around here no one takes them if they are plastic. I can’t help but notice that people around here just leave their empty tubs accumulate in their pastures. Nice uh?

Now for Vet Gun. If I were to purchase this thing it would cost me $1250. That includes CO2 cartridges, gun, and the balls. If I were to go out and start shooting a couple hundred head with this how do you suppose it’s gunna end? If I were to walk into a crowd of people and start shooting them with a paintball gun is the crowd just going to stand there? Heck no! Plus what if I miss and hit one in the eye? To me this just looks like it don’t end well.

Then there are predator wasps. I have a little experience with these guys. I have noticed a little affect with them and the cattle seem to hang around the area where the wasps were. I plan to experiment with them more in the future

wasp

Now I didn’t start my grazing system to control flies. I did it so I could look at all my cattle in just a couple hours (I couldn’t do that when I had 50 here 200 there 20 in another pasture and so on. There was too much travel time between pastures). I did it to improve soil and grass, and cut down on less desirable species, while lightening my work load. Using my system I grow more grass. Assuming I only grow a mere 150# an acre more grass, and it’s valued at $60 a ton, there is my $5000 initial investment for water line, tank, posts and poly wire in just the first year! And just a reminder, I still own these things. With the other fly controls, you spend money, use the product and it’s gone. You also are not improving rangeland, or wildlife habitat.

All of these controls take time/labor except the mineral. All of these have a negative impact except the controlled grazing and the wasps. To me it comes down to what kind of person you are. Are you really a steward of the land or not. Are you really a stockman or not. It comes down to your work ethic, and managerial skills.

 
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Posted by on April 21, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

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Things Kids Say

Over Spring and Easter break there were a bunch of little kids in the sale barns I was at. We all know kids will say the darndest things. Today I’m going to share a few I heard

One Afternoon a small class of what I am guessing to be first graders came into the cattle auction where I was buying cattle. They sat right in front of me. They were relatively quiet, and well behaved. I could still hear the auctioneer. One girl in particular was very observant. She starting asking questions about some of the cattle going through the auction ring. I was very impressed with her observations. One calf came through the ring and it was obvious something was wrong with it. She asked about it. I told her the calf could not see too well. She responded “It’s blind?” I told her “No. It can see, just not to good” Her response “Oh. He just can’t see his problems to good. That will keep him happy, because he has lots of problems”

Another day a little boy around age four or five was playing in the phone booth at a cattle sale. He had the receiver off the hook and was swinging it around by the cord. He finally paused and asked his dad what the thing was. When his dad told him it was a phone the boy looked at the receiver for a bit then tried to “swipe” it with his finger like you would with an iphone.

I was cutting some little feeder bulls I had bought. After I cut the nuts out I throw them on the ground in a pile. My little girl, age five, was there and looked at the pile and asked what they were. I told her they were nuts. After I cut another one she asked “What are nuts?” I told her “They are the boy parts” She watched me cut another one and asked “You cut them out?” I nodded. She asked “Will that make them smarter?”

 
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Posted by on April 11, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

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Slaughter Trucks

A year and a half ago we were on vacation when I noticed a bunch of gooseneck trailers all turning the same direction at an intersection. I told my wife to follow them and they lead us to the local salebarn and it was auction day. My wife waited in the café while me and my daughter, who was three at the time, went out back to view the cattle. We walked back across the parking lot to the café, and my daughter asked me “daddy, where are all the Peterbilt’s?” I told her that calvies don’t ride to town in Peterbilts in that part of the country. “Well, if we buy some calvies today we will need a Peterbilt to get them home.” Was her reply

Everyone calls livestock haulers a different name. Some common ones are, Bull hauler, cow mobile, punch hole, bull rack, pot, and evidently as we saw around Christmas time slaughter truck

First lets make one thing clear, slaughter does not take place on these trucks, just in case there is someone gullible enough to think that. There is no refrigeration to cool the meat which would be essential for the slaughter process. Second, livestock have to walk off that trailer in order to be sold. If an animal can not walk off that trailer under its own power, by law, it can’t enter the food supply.

There will be that one fateful day in every critter’s life when it will take that ride to a packing facility. Most of the hauling these trucks do, does not end at a packer’s door.

Most of the hauling that is done in the cattle biz is transporting the cattle to different phases of production.
On my operation in particular, these trucks haul cattle to my place from an auction where I purchased the cattle. Some of the cattle will stay in the home pens and some go out to pasture for the growing phase. I will sometimes hire a big truck to haul them to pasture for me. It would take me ten or more trips with my pickup and a big truck can do it in two. This gets it done quickly and greatly reduces the stress on the cattle, since they don’t need to be sorted off into small bunches all day long while I haul them.

When I decide its time I will load these cattle onto a Pot again and have them shipped to an auction where they will be sold, and then loaded again to go to a feed lot.

Think about this. These cattle have been hauled several times to different locations and there has been nothing but growth and promotion of life.

Some people use these trucks just to haul cattle out to summer pasture and back home in the late fall.

The trailers have many different features, all designed for the comfort of the livestock, convenience for the driver, and safety.
Since its winter time I’ll start with the panels the drivers add to the side of the trailer. These panels are made of plastic and are corrugated like card board. They simply slide into holders on the side of the trailer that hold them in place. This keeps the air warm inside the trailer. Their body heat warms it up. Even when it well below freezing, you will have to take your coat off once the trailer is half loaded. They are that effective! The driver will stop and check on the stock from time to time, and if need be he can add more panels to make it warmer, or if he determines they are getting to hot he can remove some panels to regulate the temperature better, and make it more comfortable for the stock.

This load came
 in at sunrise on a cold morning.  The driver used panels to insulate the trailer and keep the cattle warm

This load came in at sunrise on a cold morning. The driver used panels to insulate the trailer and keep the cattle warm


The truck and trailer has an air ride suspension, which makes the ride smooth and comfortable. To help make the rid more comfortable the driver will avoid braking hard. Show the animals some respect and don’t cut off a livestock truck, okay.

Drivers will often times put down some wood shavings or saw dust before loading. This does two things. One it reduces the noise of the animal’s hooves on the aluminum floor, and second, it helps to absorb moisture. This prevents the floor from getting slick, so animals don’t fall down. A good driver can feel it when an animal lays down, and he will stop and get the animal back up, so other animals can’t step on it and cause injury.

There are ramps on these trailers to get the animals into the different compartments. The guys that haul most of my stock have ordered these ramps to be a little longer. These longer ramps are less steep, which is easier for the stock to get up and down. There is also funnel gates inside the trailer to guide the animals where to go.

Each compartment has a gate to close it off. Some of the bigger compartments have gates in them to make them smaller. This allows stock to be kept separate for ownership, or to keep bigger animals separate from smaller ones. This prevents the big ones from injuring the small ones. All these gates have a slam latch. What that is, is a latch that automatically locks when the gate is slammed against it. This is for safety, so an animal can’t hit the gate and cause it to come back and hit the driver. Think about it, if a 1400# steer hits that gate hard it can seriously injure the driver. I’ve even seen trailers where there is a release latch on the outside of the trailer so the driver never has to get in to open them.

Some trailers have roof hatches. They will open these, to help let the hot air escape out the top of the trailer. Again this is for the comfort of the animals. On chilly mornings I have seen steam coming out the top of those roof hatches. By allowing the steam to escape it won’t settle on the animals, which may cause them to get a chill later, if they get soaking wet and then cold.

One outfit that hauls most of my cattle, has sprinklers on their trailers. They use these mostly for pigs. On a really hot day they can hook a hose up to the sprinkler and cool down the inside of the trailer. If you know pigs you can bet they will find the sprinkler and get a drink while they wait. These guys have pulled over and hooked up a hose to cool down loads of stock. Sometimes they do it while waiting in line at a packing facility. Think of that. The pigs are waiting to be unloaded at a packer, and the driver is still doing all he can to make them comfortable, even in the last hour.

I recently saw a trailer that had an airline going inside the axels. Then it goes to the rim so the driver can pump air into the tires. This is convenient for the driver and is a safety feature for him, other drivers on the road and the livestock being transported.

I am now at 1200 words and I have not even written of the safety features that are in place for the drivers protection. When you stop and think of all the thought that has gone into the design of these trailers from a safety and convenience standpoint it seems silly to call them slaughter trucks.
As one final thought, I have seen the videos the animal rights groups have put out. Most people get distracted with the point of the video, and never really look at what they are watching. Most of those trucks are old models, and the people are often times wearing clothes form the sixties or seventies. Both the trucking industry and livestock industry have made huge strides since that time period

 
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Posted by on February 9, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

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AgProud Q1

Some time ago Ryan Goodman made a list of blog topics. I thought this was one heck of a list, and thought, if I started blogging again that I’d take a swing at it. My finger tips are back on the keyboard, so here goes. (Not all 88 of these are applicable to me, but most are)

Question 1) What is your role in agriculture?

The simple, broad answer is “the growth and promotion of life”. That is what anyone in production agriculture does.

To be more specific, I own and operate a backgrounding/stocker operation, as my main enterprise. What this means is I purchase young calves, most of which are not weaned, and I take them through the growth phase of their life. The calves are then sold to a feedlot.

While the calves are here the main focus is on their health and well being. I will give them two rounds of vaccinations, make sure they are free of parasites, and address any other issues they may need. Other issues may be dehorning, castrating, or just making sure they get the vitamins and minerals they may have been lacking prior to coming here. It may be a surprise to many people just how many calves are lacking in something. For example, the hair around a calf’s ears can tell me if it’s copper deficient or not. It’s my job to identify this and get them what they need. Getting their nutrient requirements in balance gives their immune system what it needs.

Receiving a load of long haul bawling calves.  I immediately begin taking the stress off them

Receiving a load of long haul bawling calves. I immediately begin taking the stress off them

Part of the regular routine is to make sure all the animals are drinking, eating, resting, and exercising like they should. If the cattle do those things the likely hood of a problem is slim, and they will perform better.

Some of the calves I buy will stay in a feedlot pen. Others will go out to grass during the spring to fall months. I use a rotational grazing system, using temporary electric fence and a portable water system. Without getting specific here, this system plays a vital role in the health of the environment. When properly managed grazing is in place it compliments the natural cycles, such as the water cycle and mineral cycle. I have only been using this system for a few years, and have already seen species of plants come back without being reseeded, and I’ve seen an increase in forage and wildlife, such as deer and game birds, in these pastures.

One got on the wrong side of the wire

One got on the wrong side of the wire

An important role I have in agriculture is to get my little girl involved. She just turned 5, and like any other kid her age, she wants to learn. I feel it is essential to pass along knowledge, skills, and life lessons to her, as she is ready for them. Since agriculture deals with life cycles, we have a great hands on classroom for her.

A December pasture walk with my little girl.

A December pasture walk with my little girl.

Another role that I oddly find myself in, is a teacher. It seems like every year more people reach out to me for advice on something, most of whom I’ve never met. I’ve been contacted by custom grazers, feedlot managers, cow/calf producers, college students, and even extension researchers. And if I can’t help them with their questions I know who can. I was even asked to contribute to Chip Hines’ latest book “Cow Country Essays”

A seminar I was asked to speak at

A seminar I was asked to speak at

There are other roles that I play in production agriculture. My dad is a crop farmer so I help him, when he needs it and I am free. I have a haying enterprise, and sometimes do some order buying for other cattle feeders, and stocker operators.

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Due to a recent event that happened here I am going to do some agvocating, so there’s that role.

A tour I hosted for the local Chamber of Commerce leadership program

A tour I hosted for the local Chamber of Commerce leadership program

 
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Posted by on February 5, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

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Pitfalls of Good Stockmanship

I can’t ever stress enough the importance of great stockmanship. Over time as I have improved my skills I have noticed there are a few pitfalls

People will get mad. I was helping a registered cattle breeder prepare for his bull sale. He wanted to catch a special cow to have on display for customers to look at while they were selecting the bulls they wanted to bid on. A group of us consisting of myself, the owner, two hired hands and his daughter set out to gather in this cow. I evaluated the circumstance I was in. Most were athletic and in great shape. Since he thought he needed all of us to get this cow I just knew this was going to be a track meet. I was right. When they finally gave up and decided to head in for lunch I slipped behind them all to get the cow. No one noticed I did this since they were too busy complaining about her and hatching a plan to catch her after lunch. They were all eating when I came in the house. When asked what took me so long to get there I informed them that I got the cow in. Man, the boss and his daughter were upset. My actions were not mean to one up them, but it appeared to be taken that way

You will do things by yourself. When people figure out that you are capable of doing it yourself, or that you can do it better by yourself they will just stand back. I have one driver who does not get out of his truck anymore when he comes to load
You will gain weight, and get out of shape. Before I met Bud and Eunice Williams and learned from them, I used to have problems getting cattle to go where I wanted them too. This lead to me running and getting a lot of exercise. I no longer get all that exercise and started to put on a few pounds. I now have to commit myself to using a treadmill that I strategically placed in front of the TV so I can watch Netflix

Bud Williams and I

Bud Williams and I

Your vet will suffer. After improving my stockmanship skills, I have fewer pulls. Fewer pulls means I use less antibiotics. This reduced my vet bill. I wonder if I should be concerned, he has three kids to support after all.

You lose bragging rights. People who do not have good stockmanship skills get hurt. They are always telling some story of getting run over or kicked. Some even love to show you their “badge of honor”. With good skills you will not have a cast or bruises to show off.

People will think you are lazy. When you own more cattle than the other guy and he notices you take your little girl fishing on a regular basis, he begins to think you are lazy and do not do much work. He does not realize fast is slow, and slow is fast. I work my cattle slow. That is why I have time to go fishing.

It’s boring. My daughter does not have much interest in riding along to rotate pastures. She is 4 and thinks we need to drive the 4-wheeler fast. It’s boring to just sit there on the wheeler only applying pressure on occasion. For her rolling up poly wire is more fun

It makes you abnormal. Cattle will get out. When they do I guess you are supposed to panic, get mad, and get in a big hurry to get them back in. My neighbor called one morning to tell me I had one out. He called back again in about 20 minutes, because I had not shown up yet and he wanted to make sure I was coming. When he called I was walking up the road with a cigar and a cup of coffee. I didn’t want to spill by being in too much of a hurry

You’re backwards. This one comes from my good friend JG. For years his family did things the same way and had the same problems. He realized the problem was how they were going about moving the cattle. He tried it a different way and it worked. No one else cared that it worked, and saved time and energy, they were only focused on the fact he was doing it differently.

People think you lie. Myself and others that I know who learned from Bud and Eunice, or Dr. Tom Noffsinger, buy a lot of long haul high risk cattle. We do not have near the problems most people would expect. One friend even went more than a year without having one die. Since most people have difficulty weaning their home raised calves without some kind of problem, and pull rates in a big feedlot can range over 40% they conclude you are lying when you say that your pull rate is around 3% to 8%.

To learn more visit these websites

Stockmanship.com Stockmanship.com

Hand in Hand Livestock Solutions Hand in Hand Livestock Solutions

 
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Posted by on February 2, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

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Own Up to It

I came home one night, when I was in high school, and went straight to my room. My mom for some reason came to check on me.
“Have you been drinking?” she asked
“No” I mumbled
“Look at me” She commanded
“I just don’t feel good. I need to sleep”
“Look at me” She commanded again
I rolled over, and sat up. My eyes rolled back in my head and I got sick.
The next day my parents were nice and let me skip church and a family dinner, to sleep it off.
The next Monday at school, my peers gave me a hard time about how hung over I must have been. I denied it. I never admitted to my parents that I was drinking. Everybody knew I drank way too much and lived to survive one of the worst hangovers I’ve ever had.

I never owned up to it. Just took the consequences and moved on

Many cow/calf operators exhibit the same behavior. They suffer the consequences of their actions, move on and repeat them year after year. They never own up to the fact the problems they face year after year are a direct result of their management decisions.

I’m talking about winter calving specifically

Last year there was the story circulating around social media, about the producer who saved his calf from certain death by jumping into the hot tub with him, to save it from hypothermia. Many haled this as proof cattle producers will go to any lengths for the wellbeing of their stock.
If a producer really cares for his stock he will never put them into a potential situation that may cause them harm.

To clear up that statement, let me tell you this story. Last year after the hot tub story circulated, I was in a local salebarn. A couple was there and the husband half was bragging how hard they worked to save a calf from hypothermia. The wife didn’t share his enthusiasm. They had the calf in the bath tub, then in the kitchen for a while. I imagine her lack of enthusiasm was because she had livestock in her house, and it created a livestock kind of mess, and her heroic hubby didn’t help clean up. I went into the office where I know an ABS rep has some calendars stashed. I handed her one of those calendars. I showed her how each day on the calendar shows that if your cow is bred on that day it tells you approximately the day you may expect her to calve. I whispered to her “You can turn your bulls out later, and skip all this mess”. She looked at me like it had never dawned on her before.

During the conventional calving season, the cow/calf guys get up in the middle of the afternoon and leave the salebarn, to go home and check cows. You never know when you will have to intervene, in what should be a natural process, to save a calf. This costs the salebarn money, because they have to turn the heat on when all the hot air these guys expel leaves. What hot air? I can refute any talking point they may have to defend calving in winter. I used to calve in winter and made the change. I used to believe all the same things many of those who will defend it do.

I used to chew Copenhagen. I had a bad habit. One day I had to stop baling hay to run to town because I was out, and couldn’t stand it any longer. A few months later I decided it was stupid to let it have a hold on me like that and just quit. It was extremely hard. Many of you have let your cows do the same thing to you. Or it may be peer pressure from some fool. Either way if you refuse to examine a change you are trapped

I used to follow Ann Barnhardt’s blog back when it was mostly about cattle markets. She had a link to Pharo Cattle Co. I clicked every link on her page, so this was the first time I was exposed to Kit and his ideas. This was the first time I was exposed to the idea of calving in synch with nature. I had all the same ideas many of you winter calvers do and I thought someone really ought to clue this fool in. Funny thing is, ten years later after I changed to calving 1/3 of the year later, at grass time, Kit got smarter. To be clear Kit didn’t change, I did.

Now I’ve stated I can refute any talking point there is. There is one that never comes up. I stated earlier in this post that you are trapped. These talking points you so weakly defend are only in your head. You are a prisoner of your own mind. The hardest thing I had to overcome when changing my calving dates was to let go of the old ideas. Learning the new way was easy.

I can post another blog later if there is a demand for it to refute the common points to defending winter calving. I will give you this to ponder in the mean time. I posted last week that it was 20 below here. Several of my neighbors are calving. I drove by a couple of them. There were dead calves at each place. Imagine if you were wearing summer clothing and were soaking wet after coming out of a room that was 102 degrees. That is exactly what the baby calf experienced. It took only a matter of minutes for that little guy to freeze to the ground. It took a little longer for death to overtake him due to the cold. Like I said if you really cared you would not put your stock in that kind of position.

I know my neighbors worked their asses off during the night. They got cattle into their barns, and got the calves dry and started. They had to kick them out into a pen to make room for another cow in the barn. They bedded the new pairs well. Problem iscattle will bunch up and the calf they worked so hard to save may stepped on by a cow. If it steps on them in the wrong place the calf will be killed.

I know the heart break this causes. You and your stock do not need to go through this. I do know someone who is thrilled. I have not seen a coyote for over a week. I assume they must be eating well, and are sticking close to their new food source, those dead calves.

To wrap it up, I buy cattle year round of varying weights. I know there will always be a supply of cattle for me to bid on. What you may not realize, since you left the auction early to go home and cuddle your cows, is the discounts I get. When you get your check in the mail from the salebarn, you will notice that several of your good calves sold for considerably less. When your nice group of calves walked into the sale ring a guy like me will motion to the auctioneer to hold 3 for example. They sell the group then ask which three I want sorted off. I will point out the two with the froze off ears and the one with the froze off tail. I will then counter, that I will take the whole group and skip sorting if they just adjust the price on them. The discount on those three sure helps cheapen up the group. I know that you’re stunned and upset when you see the price on those three got adjusted. I know you think it’s just a dumb set of buyers who do not know quality. Maybe you’re right. I do not feel sorry for you that you worked so hard to keep them alive, only to turn around a year later and give me a discount. I am thankful.

 
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Posted by on January 26, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

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